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20130201
20130228
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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and schools closed in a number of cities. forecasters predicted new england would get the worst of it with up to three feet of snow likely in boston. mayor thomas menino. >> this is a storm of major proportions. stay off the roads. stay home. let the public works crews do their job. >> brown: the region also braced for winds reaching 75 miles an hour that will pile up drifts and almost guarantee widespread power outages. as ever, the threat prompted shoppers to pack stores, stocking up on supplies. >> this is panic shopping, so bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> you've got to plan ahead. a couple feet of snow would shut everything down and, who knows, it could be a couple of days, right? >> brown: in new york city, predictions called for as much as a foot of snow, and mayor michael bloomberg said the city had marshaled an army of plows and salt trucks. >> the sanitation department will deploy something like 1,700 snowplows and 65 front-end loaders. it also has 450 salt-spreaders already deployed. >> brown: the storm also focused new concern on the new york and new j
've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building where about 250 people worked. the cause of the blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping down. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt and
, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy and it fell at the wrong time. you know it started in the morning around rush hour and just continued until about 2:00 p.m. >> sreenivasan: the mayor said kansas city's main streets had been cleared by midday, and crews worked on residential neighborhoods. but yesterday, it was a far different story: this kansas city bus couldn't navigate the drifting snow and fishtailed into a lamp post. the snow came with high winds that piled up large drifts. and that, in turn, caused problems on the interstates. >> man, it's kind of tough out here even if you got a four wheel drive i advise you to stay in because everybody's getting stuck all over the place. it's a mess out here. >> sreenivasan: crews worked through the night and into today in missouri and kansas to plough i-70. 200 miles of the highway in kansas had been shut down as the storm blew through. today as the system tracked north and east, it created
. the syrian city of homs has seen some of the worst fighting of this civil war. as many as 20,000 people have died in the streets, but people do still live there, trying to create whatever normality they can. we have gone to see what they live is like for them. >> a fight to win the game. in this part ok homs, children get a chance to forget the war. everyone is trying to make the best of breaks between the fighting. i grant is part of a newly built market set up -- this playground is part of a newly built market set up by the local area. dozens of shops were hastily put up. she'd tell me there is an urgent need. >> displaced people could not get to their places of work. they started selling goods on the pavement, so a neighbor suggested setting up shops on a neighboring piece of land. glaxo much of the city has been destroyed. people here are eager to tell their stories, but some do not want to appear on camera, fearing arrest by security forces if they speak their mind. this man tells me he used to have a well paying job, but now he is selling through to try and make a living. he says he wa
started appearing on walls in the world's most famous city. the world is worried. if the sale goes ahead, others could soon be stripped for cash. if it starts to be removed and sold for very high prices, across the world, they may start to disappear. slave labor will be auctioned on saturday work is expected to earn more than half a million dollars. one owner truly tried to take it straight to the bank. >> the pope, now castro. the cuban president raised the possibility that he might resign. it became during a joint statement with russian president medvedev. for more on this curious comment, i spoke with the vice- president of the council of the americas. he said that we should watch his speech on sunday very carefully. he has already dropped a bombshell in cuban politics. >> he is looking for the best ratings in history for a cuban speech. this is a bit of a bombshell. nobody is anticipating that he will leave immediately, but signaling that he is getting older. he has seen what has happened to the president chavez. there does need to be a transition in the future. >> could we be lookin
of two men. ed koch, the three-term mayor of new york who transformed the city and became a celebrity in his own right. and max campleman, a diplomat who negotiated cold war treaties -- treatries and during one stage act is as moderator for "washington week in review." we have to go for now but the conversation continues online on the "washington week" webcast extra. we'll be talking about the massachusetts senate race and other topics and on our home page peak into the "washington week" video vault to see what doyle said about the immigration story back in 2007. he looks the same. keep up with daily developments over the pbs news hour and we'll see you again next week on "washington week." good night. >> corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect your forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see darningeful before it sees them. -- danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who
traits come easily for students who have grown up in the city's roughest neighborhoods where they have already developed an inner strength remarkable for their age. >> often times those skill sets are not point pointed as assets. often times kids think that they walk into this environment with liabilities. we think it's completely opposite. >> reporter: once the students move on to college they stay in regular contact with their one goal teacher through their first year. the aim is not just to get kids into college but to equip them with the support system they need to finish. >> we've seen 20, 25 years of education reform in the united states. almost all of it has been directed in prek through 12 which has -- so we see that proliferation of charter schools we've seen early childhood interventions work, we've seen human capital providers, we've seen big city mayors like rahm emanuel take over education yet almost none of it has spread to higher education. so our country has begun to get college access right but we see huge dropout rates in college. >> reporter: cynthia barren is a coac
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the story of dick cheney is the story of power. he served two terms as vice president, president george w. bush from twub two 2008. he was also secretary of defense he was also chief of staff to president gerald ford. the "washington post" has called him the most influential and powerful man ever to hold the office. he was in washington an insider. his story is a story not only of power but because of what happened after 9/11 it's a story of power and values. we begin a conversation that took place in washington. mr. vice president, thank you very much for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot and as of last march i got a transplant, go
and businesses lost power, and kansas city declared an emergency. the storm had already battered the texas panhandle. winds there reached hurricane force, and piled drifts more than two feet high in some places. negotiations on iran's nuclear program restarted today for the first time in eight months. the two-day talks opened in kazakhstan. the u.s. and other world powers offered to ease some international sanctions, if iran will limit activities that could lead to nuclear weapons. . >> it addresses international concerns on the exclusively peaceful nature of the iranian nuclear program but it's also responsive to iranian ideas. we hope very much that iran will seize this opportunity and come to the talks with flexibility and a commitment to make concrete progress toward building steps. >> sreenivasan: in response, iran said it will make a counter-offer during the talks. in egypt, at least 19 people were killed in one of the deadliest ballooning accidents ever. a hot air balloon carrying tourists caught fire over the ancient city of luxor and crashed in a field. the dead were from europe a
, it is the independent state of the vatican city. we are not allowed to take our cameras. you get a sense of the separations that are already under way. the following day will be his last day in office. he will have a private meeting with the cardinals that have already arrived in rome. later that day at 5:00 p.m. local time, the pope will board a helicopter and go to his summer residence about 15 miles from here. at about 8:00 p.m. local time, he will cease to be pulte. pe. po it will create a vacancy that normally occurs on the death of a pulp. then the replacement for pope benedict xvi will begin in earnest. >> these days, businesses going bust is hardly a deadline. of burke ofdline traders in afghanistan to increasing demand of driving them to diversify or closed shop altogether. centuries, the burqa has been the emblem of afghanistan. but nowadays in kabul, it is not quite the same. wholesalers stilt supplied to other regions of the country with their own -- still supplied to other regions of the country with their own unique shape. the burqa business is taking a bit of dundalk, fall
murders, has barricaded himself in a cabin in the big bear lake area, 80 miles east of the city. when police showed up, gunfire broke out. ey received information from the person reporting that the stolen vehicle was stolen by an individual that appeared to be very similar to christopher dorner. immediately we conducted a ground and air search for this vehicle. they were able to locate it at highway 38 and glass roads where the suspect in the vehicle fled into the forest. shortly thereafter, this individual barricaded himself in one of the cabins there and an exchange of gun fire occurred. during that exchange of gun fire, two officers were injured. >> sreenivasan: we get more from public radio. the reporter spoke to us a short while ago from the scene of the activity. frank, thanks for joining us. bring us up to speed. what happened today? >> well, it was in the early afternoon that a police got reports of a truck being commandeered in the big bear area. now, this suspect's truck had been found there a few days earlier burned out. this truck that he was driving apparently commandeere
state law allow cities and counties to ban cannabis dispensaries? even though voters approve the use of medical marijuana? >> the legislature knows how to say, thou shalt not ban dispensaries. they didn't say that. >> that's the question before california's highest court this week. the ruling could have a huge impact on the state's massive medical marijuana industry. >>> job growth in silicon valley is outpacing the rest of the nation. but a new report says the income gap between rich and poor is widening. leaving some minorities behind. >>> with the number of people riding bicycles rising fast, san francisco planners roll out a multimillion dollar strategy to add bike lanes, parking stations and other improvements. we'll talk with the head of the san francisco bicycle coalition. >>> plus, california takes the first step to grant special protection to the ocean's top predator. coming up next.
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we have spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higher education. the simple fact that the more education y
, part of the city's celebrity series, at the beginning of just their second-ever visit to the u.s. backstage, musicians aged 15 to 36 warmed up and chatted in a variety of languages. >> no, no, no! >> brown: at rehearsal, barenboim was a tough taskmaster... >> you see how much more space you have for a crescendo? please don't play mechanically. >> brown: ...cajoling his young musicians. >> you're just playing comfortably without any idea of thought. ya-ba-ba-ba. what is that? >> brown: i watched the rehearsal, and you were pretty tough on them at various points. you kept saying, "you're playing too comfortably." what does that mean? >> it means that to make music, to express music, you cannot adopt the line of least resistance. you have to adopt the line of most resistance. music is not politically correct. music demands total concentration and the perfect, perfect matrimony between thought, feeling, and gut. >> brown: so how? >> and people who think it's easy should choose another profession. >> brown: uncompromising in his music, barenboim is also uncompromising in his politic
rallies, dances and vigils in dozens of major cities. the events were held to coincide with valentine's day. the united nations has estimated that one of every three women worldwide, is raped or beaten in the course of a lifetime. a long-time leader in american a new implantable device that restores some vision in the blind won approval today in the united states. the food and drug administration agreed to allow use of the argus 2 retinal prosthesis. it uses electrodes in the retina that receives signals from a wireless camera on a pair of glasses. initially the device will help small numbers, but it may ultimately treat vision disorders in millions. a long-time leader in american foods-- heinz is being sold to a group that includes warren buffett. the $23.3 billion deal announced today will make heinz a privately held company. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nine points to close at 13,973. the nasdaq rose a point to close at 3,198. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: there were more hurdles today for president obama's se
are going out of this airplane? >> through the city of antwerp, which is the main diamond cartier in belgium, we have eight in every ten uncut diamond and five in every ten uncut diamonds. it's worth billions. >> sreenivasan: thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. >> sreenivasan: the civilian death toll in afghanistan has dropped for the first time in six years. a new report today from the united nations said more than 2,700 civilians died last year. that was down from more than 3,100 the previous year. still, violence claimed the lives of more women and girls, up 20% from 2011. the new data came a day after president hamid karzai banned afghan troops from calling in air strikes in residential areas. the former top u.s. commander in afghanistan is going to retire, instead of becoming the overall nato commander in europe. president obama announced today that marine general john allen will end his military career. allen's nomination for the nato post was put on hold last fall, amid questions about e-mail exchanges with a woman in florida. the general was cleared of all wrongdoing, but he sai
't... i wasn't in like this city, in this state, or like even on this earth, so my whole grand scheme, grand plan was like suicide by cop. >> reporter: andy planned a so called suicide by cop, expecting the authorities to gun him down, but he had a change of heart at the last minute dropped the revolver and surrendered. researchers say 60% of rampage shooters are suicidal before the carnage. psychologist john keilp studies suicidal people, trying to find out how their brains differ from others. >> we're looking at what's different about those people. one of the things i think we feel confident about is that there is something different about those people, that it's not just a feature of depression. >> take your three fingers and put it on the buttons and one, two, and three stands for the response red, blue or green. >> reporter: keilp believes one fundamental difference may show up in a deceptively simple test, which he let me try. it is called a stroop test invented by psychologist john ridley stroop in the 1930s. it sounds simple: all i had to do is identify the color i saw in the
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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